SUV, “vehículo deportivo”

Re the Times Square car bomb, José M Guardia comments on the mistranslation of Chelsea tractor by Cadena Ser and others. While their minds may well be as furry as porcine slurry, the marketing of a vehicle allegedly (where?) designed for exotic and perilous deserts to surgically improved mums to transport their precious tots half a mile to school does create ample scope for creativity.

[
I wonder if the use of an SUV by the would-be New York bomber is not a sign of its decline as a status symbol. There was a great growth in their use in Spain at the time of the “No war for oil” movement, demonstrating the paradoxical nature of tercermundista anti-Americanism, but my impression this last year is that sales are down vis-à-vis other types. Maybe the cultural lead-time between Anglocabronía and Barcelona isn’t as great as some expat bar pundits believe.
]

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Posted on

This post pre-dates my organ-grinding days, and may be imported from elsewhere.

Barcelona (490):

Cadena Ser (2): From other capitalisation: This is a redirect from a title with another method of capitalisation.

Catalonia (141):

English language (430):

Föcked Translation (413): I posted to a light-hearted blog called Fucked Translation over on Blogger from 2007 to 2016, when I was often in Barcelona. Its original subtitle was "What happens when Spanish institutions and businesses give translation contracts to relatives or to some guy in a bar who once went to London and only charges 0.05€/word." I never actually did much Spanish-English translation (most of my work is from Dutch, French and German) but I was intrigued and amused by the hubristic Spanish belief, then common, that nepotism and quality went hand in hand, and by the nemeses that inevitably followed.

Spain (507):

Spanish language (427):

Translation (465):


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