Cervantes, prototype for el Cobrador del Frac?

Peter Harvey is suffering from that perennial Spanish problem–translation agencies that don’t pay the modest rates they promise.

This blog enjoys dressing up but has no plans to become for the translation sector what el Cobrador del Frac is for the world at large: a debt collection agency which compensates for a deeply flawed legal system by using fancy dress to exert moral pressure on unrepentant debtors. Last year Popular Televisión Navarra ran a nice little piece on them:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a5a_GjkXOgQ

SMEs and, increasingly, bankrupt local authorities form a substantial part of the problem. So how appropriate it was that a bill proposed in spring last year which, rather than improving creditor protection, would have shielded debtors from embarrassment (!!!) was associated with CiU, which garners much of its support from SMEs, is involved in a welter of embezzlement cases, and is run by lawyers, who would benefit as a sector from a crackdown on street artists.

I have no idea what happened to the bill, and I hope it failed. Antonio Burgos wondered a while back whether the reduction in unemployment in the Aznar years wasn’t due solely to a rapid growth in the number of creditor agents dressed as clowns, monks, and Groucho Marx. El Cobrador del Frac, however, suggests that had Cervantes not been an itinerant debt collector Quijote might not have been born

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This post pre-dates my organ-grinding days, and may be imported from elsewhere.

Barcelona (490):

Clown (15):

English language (430):

Föcked Translation (413): I posted to a light-hearted blog called Fucked Translation over on Blogger from 2007 to 2016, when I was often in Barcelona. Its original subtitle was "What happens when Spanish institutions and businesses give translation contracts to relatives or to some guy in a bar who once went to London and only charges 0.05€/word." I never actually did much Spanish-English translation (most of my work is from Dutch, French and German) but I was intrigued and amused by the hubristic Spanish belief, then common, that nepotism and quality went hand in hand, and by the nemeses that inevitably followed.

Spain (507):

Spanish language (427):

Translation (465):


Conversation

  1. Thanks for the mention. In fact, this is only the second time in twenty years that I have had a non-payment. And as I said, I had worked with one of the partners in this agency when he as somewhere else.

    The other non-paying client was in Munich. I did have one in Madrid who was erratic and slow, but did pay in the end. And I have had to wait months on end for UPC to pay, but public bodies do always stump up some time.

  2. I've obviously been listening to the wrong people re Spanish non-payment. Ftr, my only ever problem was with a Canadian, and an explanation of the benefits of internet fixed him.

  3. Does Cobrador del frac work correct?
    Does exist company oficial?
    We have one non-payment(debtor). So we have concluded the contract with this agency and paid money for them. And after 3 month we became per post the end bill (total factura) and we think that contact is finished. Is correct? During 3 months we got nothing information all the time about how its going. When we call there, we become so answers from secretary that contact person in this agency is ill or has holidays or whatever. the same when we send e-mails, also are nothing. We think so, that Cobrador del frac wants to win time and does nothing with this debtor. Maybe they live for percent from contracts what people must pay in first?
    Do you know the same сase?

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