El País spells its subject’s name in three different ways in the space of five lines

When even copying is too hard:

Foreing Parts’ gana el premio DocsBarcelona a la mejor película
El premio TV-3 de Derechos Humanos fue para un film sobre las matanzas de los Jemeres Rojos
La película Foreign Parts de los directores Véréna Paravel y Paul Sniadecki ganó ayer el premio DocsBarcelona a la Mejor Película del Festival de Documentales que ayer se clausuró en la Filmoteca de Cataluña. Foreigng Parts habla de una extraña comunidad donde los residuos y el material para reciclar forman un comercio emergente, y los coches son desguazados y clasificados por marca y piezas, y revendidos a una lista inacabable de clientes que pasan por el barrio, según ha explicado la organización del certamen en un comunicado.

“Sniadecki” is difficult but correct, so I figure the journalist and the sub thought they knew how to spell “foreign” and decided to type it instead of copy-pasting. “If you can’t sing it, rewrite,” goes the rule, and you can’t sing with a foreigng in your throat.

(Thanks JR)

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This post pre-dates my organ-grinding days, and may be imported from elsewhere.

Barcelona (490):

Catalonia (141):

El País (6): El País is the second most read newspaper in Spanish online and the second most circulated daily newspaper in Spain, and one of three Madrid dailies considered to be national newspapers of record for Spain. Its headquarters and central editorial staff are located in Madrid, although there are regional offices in the principal Spanish cities where regional editions are produced.

English language (430):

Föcked Translation (413): I posted to a light-hearted blog called Fucked Translation over on Blogger from 2007 to 2016, when I was often in Barcelona. Its original subtitle was "What happens when Spanish institutions and businesses give translation contracts to relatives or to some guy in a bar who once went to London and only charges 0.05€/word." I never actually did much Spanish-English translation (most of my work is from Dutch, French and German) but I was intrigued and amused by the hubristic Spanish belief, then common, that nepotism and quality went hand in hand, and by the nemeses that inevitably followed.

Spain (506):

Spanish language (427):

Translation (465):


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