The Danish pseudo-Anglicisms “klipning” and “barbering” in an ethnic Chinese barber’s in Barcelona

Is klipning the same as haircut, and barbering indistinguishable from a shave, i.e. is this a bilingual ad? Or is there a Danish tweak in there? Wanted: identical twins for testing.

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Posted on 2013

Barcelona (483):

English language (424):

Föcked Translation (413): I posted to a light-hearted blog called Fucked Translation over on Blogger from 2007 to 2016, when I was often in Barcelona. Its original subtitle was "What happens when Spanish institutions and businesses give translation contracts to relatives or to some guy in a bar who once went to London and only charges 0.05€/word." I never actually did much Spanish-English translation (most of my work is from Dutch, French and German) but I was intrigued and amused by the hubristic Spanish belief, then common, that nepotism and quality went hand in hand, and by the nemeses that inevitably followed.

Spain (464):

Spanish language (426):

Translation (462):


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