More chavales

Re chav, here From a lexicon of flamenco song terms derived from Caló and thieves’ dialects (germanías):

Re chav, here From a lexicon of flamenco song terms derived from Caló and thieves’ dialects (germanías):

CHABAL (chabá, chabó; chabal, chavea, chavó)

  1. Niño, hijo
    De tres chabositos que tengo
    Uno le endiño a mi suegro,
    Otro le endiño a mi bata;
    Y el otro guillará cormigo
    Pa donde quiera que yo baya.

    [Of the three sons I have
    One I give to my father-in-law
    Another I give to my mother
    And the other will go with me
    Wherever his fancy takes.]

  2. Muchacho, joven
    Mi mare me lo esía:
    No te fíes de chabales
    Que tienen malas partías.

    [My mother said this to me:
    Don’t trust lads
    With bad habits.]

The first chaval I know of turns up in Eduardo Asquerino’s 1842 Matamuertos y el cruel: juguete andaluz en un acto y en verso, which makes much more liberal use of ceceo, the characteristically Andalusian lisping of the s, c and z, than Galdós dared. Here’s an excerpt in which Curra agrees to open the door to Matamuertos (Corpse-killer) when he returns with his guitar:

CURRA
Oiga, chaval:
Aunque eztoy comprometía
voy a abrir por cariá,
y agraézgamelo uzté,
que zi ze marcha, quisás
tope con algún falucho
que le haga a uzté naufragar.
MATAMUERTOS
Mu bien; maz entro d’un rato
volveré; voy a buzcar
mi guitarra, y cantarémoz
laz coplaz e caliá. (Se va.)

Similar posts


Comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *