Loft of gipsy homing pigeons painted in the colours of Spain and Andalusia

Snapped by SG on a lovely clear day last week on a variation of this Barcelona city walk. The birds belong to three tired-looking gents who one would have said were hippophiles pertaining to the kingdom of Dionysus, so we didn’t enquire as to the whys and wherefores.

Birds are often painted for ceremonial or magical purposes. For example,

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Comments

  1. These birds are actually Modern Spanish Thief Pouters. In fact, if you look closely you can see some of the males are flying with inflated crops. They aren’t colored for magical purposes or otherwise. They are colored because of the game being played. The birds are in the colors of their individual owners so that they can be recognized at a distance. Birds are put up and chase a hen bird which has a white feather attached to her. The male birds are judged on their “wooing” abilities.

    This breed is very popular here in the States within some of the Cuban and Spanish communities and also popular in some parts of Mexico and S. American countries.

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